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Elephas antiquus molar tooth, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum. This now extinct species was twice the size of a modern African elephant, a relative of the woolly mammoth.
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Thursday, August 31, 2018
Thursday, August 29, 2018
Elephas antiquus molar tooth, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum. This now extinct species was twice the size of a modern African elephant, a relative of the woolly mammoth.
Elephas antiquus molar tooth, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum. This now extinct species was twice the size of a modern African elephant, a relative of the woolly mammoth.

c.900,000 years ago

Our stone age ancestors

Ancestors of modern humans share the landscape with large mammals which they learn to hunt for food.

The land mass yet to become Britain is still attached to the continent.

Stone hand axe from Lower Paleolithic period, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum
Stone hand axe from Lower Paleolithic period, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum

c.900,000 years ago

Our stone age ancestors

Ancestors of modern humans share the landscape with large mammals which they learn to hunt for food.

The land mass yet to become Britain is still attached to the continent.

Stone hand axe from Lower Paleolithic period, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum
Stone hand axe from Lower Paleolithic period, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum
Elephas antiquus molar tooth, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum. This now extinct species was twice the size of a modern African elephant, a relative of the woolly mammoth.
Elephas antiquus molar tooth, © Kent County Council Sevenoaks Museum. This now extinct species was twice the size of a modern African elephant, a relative of the woolly mammoth.
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